Volkswagen Eos Finale Set

After a nine-year model run, Volkswagen has set an end date for its Eos hard-top convertible. Yet another convertible model is to be discontinued as consumers embrace other vehicle choices.

Volkswagen Eos

We don’t cover the Volkswagen brand as much as we would prefer to on Auto Trends. A current lack of access to fleet vehicles and a paucity of hot cars restricts our news. There is only so much one can say about the Golf and Jetta!

Sadly, one of the better products to come from VW is also being discontinued this year —the hard-top Eos convertible. Eos — goddess of the dawn in Greek mythology — is an attractive 2+2 cabriolet, a generously contented model that deserves citation among pricier models, including the Lexus IS C.

June Swan Song for the EOS

We already knew that 2015 would be the final year for the Eos, but its official wind down window wasn’t known. Well, that changed earlier this week when several sources, including Automotive News Europe, confirmed that production will end by May or June. That retirement will conclude a nine-year model run with approximately 230,000 models built at a Volkswagen plant in Portugal.

The EOS’ appeal can be traced to a number of factors, including its good looks, a reasonable price and its excellent hard top. That top is a five-piece steel and glass roof that folds section by section with each part folding on top of the next part. In just 25 seconds the roof lowers itself into the trunk, while keeping 10.6 cubic feet clear for storage.

The VW Eos also has a feature that not one of its competitors can claim: a built-in, power sunroof. So, if you want a partial solar experience instead of the traditional wind-in-your-face convertible adventure, you have a choice.

Volkswagen Eos

The Mid-Level Final Edition

The 2015 Volkswagen Eos 2.0T is powered by a 2.0-liter, turbocharged four-cylinder engine producing 200 horsepower at 5,100 rpm and 207 foot-pounds of torque at 1,750 rpm. It comes paired with a six-speed dual-clutch transmission to deliver 22 mpg in the city and 30 mpg on the highway. The Eos takes premium grade gasoline.

Pricing for 2015 starts at $35,795 for the base Komfort model and reaches $42,335 for the Executive edition. For its final year, a “Final Edition” trim level ($39,165) replaces the previous mid-grade trim, bringing in Bi-Xenon headlamps, headlight washers, LED daytime running lights, 18-inch Vincenza alloy wheels set within all-season tires, upgraded leather seating surfaces with contrast stitching, sport suspension with body lowering, a multifunction steering wheel and keyless access with push-button start.

The Final Edition includes all Komfort features such as: the power tilt and slide glass sunroof with wind deflector, footwell lights, cornering lamps, front fog lamps, navigation system, Bluetooth connectivity, and a 12-way power driver’s seat with power lumbar. The Executive edition brings in a 10-speaker audio system; a rear view camera; decorative indoor trim, including wood inlays; a power front passenger seat with lumbar; and park distance control.

The Independent Suspension Advantage

Another delicious feature of the front-wheel-drive Eos is its fully independent suspension system. Up front, a strut arrangement with lower control arms, coil springs and an anti-roll bar is at work. To the rear a compact four-link arrangement is mounted on a subframe, one acoustically decoupled from the main body in an effort to mitigate road noise and vibration. Electronic power steering, four-wheel disc brakes and an assortment of safety features, including anti-slip regulation, is also included.

With the VW Eos’ days numbered, there just aren’t that many convertibles left, especially in this segment. The Mini Cooper Convertible is one such model as are a handful of pricier vehicles from Audi, BMW, Mercedes-Benz and Lexus.


See AlsoGood Deal or Not: Fleet Vehicles

Photos courtesy of the Volkswagen Group.

Author: Matthew Keegan
Matt Keegan has maintained his love for cars ever since his father taught him kicking tires can be one way to uncover a problem with a vehicle’s suspension system. He since moved on to learn a few things about coefficient of drag, G-forces, toe-heel shifting, and how to work the crazy infotainment system in some random weekly driver. Matt is a member of the Washington Automotive Press Association and is a contributor to various print and online media sources.

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