The Do’s and Don’ts of Driving an Electric Vehicle

Electric Vehicles (EVs) have taken the automotive industry – and the larger public’s attention – by storm. Discussions around, advertisements for, and references to EVs can be found all across news sites and channels, commercials, social media sites, and more.

Most recently, Ford released that it would build $11.4 billion worth of mega campuses just for EV production, and General Motors announced it would open a Michigan-based Innovation Center that will work to slash EV battery costs. On top of that, five Midwestern governors across Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin just agreed to create a new EV charging network.


Plug-In Electric Vehicle


But even as automakers and lawmakers alike get behind the push for an EV revolution, drivers themselves are still getting acquainted with how best to take care of these vehicles. There are several key factors drivers must follow when it comes to EV care and maintenance, charging practices, battery life, and more.

With this in mind, ACERTUS’ drive-away team has put together a list of the top Do’s and Don’ts for those who drive EVs.


Electric Vehicle Do’s


DO make sure you charge your EV for the range you need.

While it’s not recommended to regularly charge your EV to full capacity, if you’re going on a longer drive or a road trip where you need long-range, it’s okay to charge the battery to full. Most days, you won’t need 100% of your EV’s battery range anyway. It’s best to try and stay between 20-80% charging capacity, except when you need the full driving range of your vehicle.

DO have a charging plan for your EV.

It’s crucial to have a game plan when it comes to charging your EV, as public charging stations are more prevalent in urban areas currently. Anyone who buys an EV for personal use should also invest in a 240-volt home charger, which is both efficient and cost-effective. If you have this type of charger installed at home, you’ll add anywhere from 10 to 60 miles of range each hour to your EV. If you need faster charging or a backup plan for longer trips, public fast-chargers can be useful – but only certain EVs can accept this type of charging, and fast-charging should be done infrequently since it is hard on batteries. No matter what, EV drivers must understand the limitations of their particular vehicles when it comes to charging.

DO take care of your EV’s battery.

Both keeping the battery at zero charge and repeatedly charging the battery to full will cause it to degrade more quickly. Most EVs have settings that allow drivers to choose when they’d like the battery to start charging and how fully they’d like to charge it. Make sure to protect your EV from too much heat or cold, as well, as both can impact the battery.

DO make sure you take advantage of any applicable EV tax credits.

New EV buyers have the most to gain from tax-credit opportunities. At filing time, brand-new EV buyers can get a one-time tax break that ranges anywhere from $2,500-7,500, depending on the gross battery capacity. However, there are some catches when it comes to these tax credits – for example, if your taxes don’t exceed the amount your EV qualifies for, you won’t qualify for a check that makes up the difference.

Additionally, for companies with commercial fleets, there are subsidies available for those who invest in charging stations.


Electric Vehicle Don’ts


DON’T wait until the last minute to charge your EV.

Unlike more traditional fuel-based vehicles, you don’t want to wait until the last minute to fuel up – or rather, charge up – your electric car. In fact, you shouldn’t, as an EV battery with a very low charge can cause the vehicle to have less available power to draw from. At that point, the driver usually receives an alert to find a charging station or pull over.

DON’T forget about maintenance.

While electric motors don’t require oil changes like those in fuel-based vehicles, it’s still crucial to give your EV regular checks, ensure that brake pads are working, follow proper battery maintenance, and get tire checks and rotations per usual. It’s important to note that EVs do have a thermal-management system like other vehicles, which means they still need coolant. Brake fluid and wiper fluid are both required, as well.

DON’T leave your EV in extreme heat or cold for too long.

EV batteries don’t do well when in extreme hot or cold weather. Heat can degrade the car battery, while the cold will reduce your EV range. It’s best to keep EVs out of the hot sun for multiple hours, or if it’s cold outside, keep your EV stored in a garage if possible.

DON’T ignore anything that seems off.

If something seems off about your EV, don’t ignore it! Take the vehicle to an EV-specialized technician, or straight to the manufacturer, for more thorough checks or any necessary repairs.


ACERTUS is Prepared to Move and Care for EVs


Already, vehicle-logistics provider ACERTUS has prepared to both move and take care of electric vehicles. It has incorporated EV-charging infrastructure into its operations – both equipment that is stationary and those that can be used on the go – so its network of drivers and carriers can successfully complete transports.

Beyond being able to help with EV transports, ACERTUS has the expertise to assist with compliance services and title and registration for these vehicles. Even though many states are still working to determine what their exact requirements will be around EV compliance and registration requirements, the teams at ACERTUS are monitoring these policies at the federal, state and local levels around the country – and they already have measures in place to ensure their auto partners are covering themselves when it comes to staying on top of these needs.

ACERTUS can also help with storage facilities for EVs, telematics and additional care and maintenance as those needs arise. Whether a customer simply needs transportation for these vehicles, or needs a full EV program to be developed and then implemented, the team members at ACERTUS can help.


Learn more about ACERTUS’ services for electric vehicles, including its full range of vehicle-shipping and automotive-logistics solutions, at https://acertusdelivers.com. To connect with one of our team members or receive a quote, contact us here or call us at this phone number: 855-ACERTUS (855-223-7887).


Photo Attribution


Image by Stan Petersen from Pixabay

Image by A. Krebs from Pixabay

Terri is currently the Vice President of Driveaway for ACERTUS and has nearly 20 years of experience in the fleet and transportation industry. Prior to her current role, she held various positions with AmeriFleet, which through a series of acquisitions helped form ACERTUS in 2018, including Vice President of Transportation Services, Director of Client Relations, Client Relations Manager, and Account Consultant. She previously served as the Service Center Liaison at PHH Arval. Terri is actively engaged with various fleet organizations, including the Automotive Fleet Leasing Association (AFLA) and serves on their communications committee.

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