In Photos: 2021 Ford F-150 Raptor!

Raptor rapture returns in the form of this latest-generation performance pickup truck.


2021 Ford F-150 Raptor
2021 Ford F-150 Raptor.

The range-topping Raptor is back, an all-new model based on the current generation Ford F-150. This week, Ford introduced its capstone model, set for an early summer debut as a 2021 model. While some of the engine details aren’t clear, a high-output version of Ford’s twin-turbocharged 3.5-liter V6 engine will once again move this performance truck. Ford also said that an even more powerful variant, the Raptor R, will roll out next year.

The Raptor has long been the most off-road capable pickup truck in the world, although the 2021 Ram 1500 TRX with its supercharged V8 engine is now the most powerful. That’s where we believe the future Raptor R will fit in, although those details are not yet known.

To prime the Raptor pump, our photo essay offers details on what we know about this pickup truck. Each photo is captioned; we’ll conclude with our usual model summation.


2021 Ford F-150 Raptor
The available Rigid brand off-road lighting mounted in the front bumper
supplies drivers with enhanced illumination when they need it.

2021 Ford F-150 Raptor
The Raptor’s hood features a new heat extractor and functional side vents at the top trailing edge of the fender, what Ford says was inspired by the intakes of the F-22 Raptor fighter jet.

2021 Ford F-150 Raptor
Carl Widmann, Ford Performance chief engineer, had a few words to say about the latest Raptor.

“Raptor is rooted in Baja 1000 racing, and its suspension advances our capability and performance – a five-link rear setup with more wheel travel than any Raptor before it.

“And like a trophy truck, every aspect of Raptor has been engineered to deliver precision capability when your foot is flat on the floor, way out in the middle of nowhere roaring across the desert.”


2021 Ford F-150 Raptor
The Raptor, when equipped with available 37-inch tires, features 13.1 inches of running clearance,
33.1 degrees of approach angle, a maximum 24.9 degrees of
departure angle and 24.4 degrees of breakover angle.

2021 Ford F-150 Raptor
As before, the Raptor comes with standard 35-inch tires. However, this year, customers can upgrade to 37-inch tires for better clearance and enhanced articulation.

2021 Ford F-150 Raptor
Readings from suspension height sensors and other sensors around the truck change damping rates independently at each corner 500 times per second, with the next-generation FOX Live Valve internal bypass shocks responding at the same speed the human brain processes visual information. The truck responds by the time the driver even registers a terrain change.

2021 Ford F-150 Raptor
A class-exclusive Pro Power Onboard, gives owners the ability to use their truck as a mobile generator. Raptor can be ordered with an available 2.0 kilowatts of exportable output to
run power tools, camp lights and other equipment, providing more
exportable power than any light-duty full-size pickup competitor.

2021 Ford F-150 Raptor
The Raptor features a wide and modern cabin with room for five adults.

2021 Ford F-150 Raptor
The driver-centric cockpit features digital displays and over-the-air updates to keep mapping in real-time. The 12-inch center display is new and fully customizable.

2021 Ford F-150 Raptor
A new standard and customizable 12-inch digital gauge cluster features a large information-on-demand area with Raptor-specific graphics and animations, off-road data and turn-by-turn navigation.

2021 Ford F-150 Raptor
The Raptor features and auxiliary switchboard with six prewired switches useful for electrical accessories. Owners often use them for driving lights, long-range lights,
fender lights, rear lights or bed LED lights.

Sublime Raptor

All in all, the latest Raptor fulfills its mission in a special way. However, the shadow of the 1500 TRX looms large, the first-ever true challenger for this burly pickup truck. Again, we’ll have to wait a year to see the Raptor R in action, what promises to raise this battle to a deliciously intoxicating level.


See Also –- King of all Trucks: Ford F-150 Raptor

Photos courtesy of the Ford Motor Company. All rights reserved.

Author: Matthew Keegan
Matt Keegan has maintained his love for cars ever since his father taught him kicking tires can be one way to uncover a problem with a vehicle’s suspension system. He since moved on to learn a few things about coefficient of drag, G-forces, toe-heel shifting, and how to work the crazy infotainment system in some random weekly driver. Matt is a member of the Washington Automotive Press Association and is a contributor to various print and online media sources.